Mark Zuckerberg Meta: About Metaverse

Mark Zuckerberg Meta

The Mark Zuckerberg Meta; Facebook metaverse would be more like a video game, with each destination being a three-dimensional space, rather than the World Wide Web, which consists of flat, two-dimensional pages that we access via browsers.

About Mark Zuckerberg Meta; Facebook Metaverse

Nothing excites Silicon Valley more than the next big thing, and after years of whispers, the next big thing has emerged as the Facebook metaverse, which big tech is referring to as the next generation of the internet. The Facebook metaverse is a catch-all term for a connected set of immersive virtual experiences that you explore online through your three-dimensional avatar, a character on the screen who may or may not look like you in real life.
The metaverse is frequently associated with the use of virtual reality (VR) headsets to immerse yourself in a digital world, such as those depicted in the 2018 blockbuster “Ready Player One.”
The heads of Epic, the makers of the wildly popular video game Fortnite, Nvidia, the leader in chips that enable graphic displays, and even industry stalwart Microsoft have joined the chorus of big tech CEOs who say their companies will help build the metaverse.

But no one has stepped up to the plate like Mark Zuckerberg, the CEO of Facebook. Zuck first announced that his company would become a metaverse company. Facebook recently announced that it intends to hire 10,000 engineers in Europe to help build the metaverse. Facebook just announced on Thursday that its new company name will be Meta, reflecting its focus on being a metaverse company.
Some speculate that Zuckerburg’s Facebook metaverse obsession is a ruse to divert attention away from the company’s recent negative press. But geeks know that his obsession isn’t new: he’s been talking about it since Facebook bought Oculus, the first consumer virtual reality headset company, for $2 billion almost a decade ago.

Zuckerburg has made it clear that he wants to be the dominant on-ramp to the next generation of the internet, a “embodied internet” in which we don’t just passively browse by looking at screens on our phones and computers, but instead explore with our avatars as if we were visiting a physical location.
Facebook is betting that virtual reality headsets, such as Facebook’s own Oculus Quest, will be used to access the metaverse. Facebook is also betting that lighter-weight augmented reality (AR) glasses, such as the ones it is releasing in collaboration with Ray-Ban, will allow the metaverse to expand beyond the computer, allowing virtual objects to appear in the real world.

Virk, Rizwan As Mark Zuckerberg attempts to rule the metaverse, Facebook becomes Meta. That’s why it’s improbable.
Disruptive innovations are transforming the concept of the metaverse right before our eyes. One of them is no longer Facebook.
Rizwan Virk, founder of MIT’s Play Labs
Nothing excites Silicon Valley more than the next big thing, and after years of whispers, the next big thing has emerged as the metaverse, which big tech is referring to as the next generation of the internet. The metaverse is a catch-all term for a connected set of immersive virtual experiences that you explore online through your three-dimensional avatar, a character on the screen who may or may not look like you in real life.

Facebook is still operating on an out-of-date and soon-to-be-out-of-date vision of the future.

The Facebook metaverse would be more like a video game, with each destination being a three-dimensional space, rather than the World Wide Web, which consists of flat, two-dimensional pages that we access via browsers. The metaverse is frequently associated with the use of virtual reality (VR) headsets to immerse yourself in a digital world, such as those depicted in the 2018 blockbuster “Ready Player One.”

The heads of Epic, the makers of the wildly popular video game Fortnite, Nvidia, the leader in chips that enable graphic displays, and even industry stalwart Microsoft have joined the chorus of big tech CEOs who say their companies will help build the metaverse.

But no one has stepped up to the plate like Mark Zuckerberg, the CEO of Facebook. Zuck first announced that his company would become a metaverse company. Facebook recently announced that it intends to hire 10,000 engineers in Europe to help build the metaverse. Facebook just announced on Thursday that its new company name will be Meta, reflecting its focus on being a metaverse company.


Some speculate that Mark Zuckerburg Meta; Facebook metaverse obsession is a ruse to divert attention away from the company’s recent negative press. Those in the geek community, however, are aware that his obsession isn’t entirely new: He’s been talking about it since Facebook paid $2 billion for Oculus, the first consumer virtual reality headset company, almost a decade ago.

Zuckerburg has made it clear that he wants to be the dominant on-ramp to the next generation of the internet, a “embodied internet” in which we don’t just passively browse by looking at screens on our phones and computers, but instead explore with our avatars as if we were visiting a physical location.

Facebook is betting that virtual reality headsets, such as Facebook’s own Oculus Quest, will be used to access the metaverse. Facebook is also betting that lighter-weight augmented reality (AR) glasses, such as the ones it is releasing in collaboration with Ray-Ban, will allow the metaverse to expand beyond the computer, allowing virtual objects to appear in the real world.


This would allow Facebook to bypass the gatekeepers who currently control the on-ramps to our current web-based internet, which is increasingly accessed via Apple and Google-controlled mobile devices. (I own Google, Facebook, and Microsoft stock.)

It’s not surprising that Silicon Valley, which is obsessed with making science fiction a reality, has turned its attention to the metaverse and is using video game technology such as headsets as a launching pad. Video games are more popular than ever (the video game industry is expected to be worth nearly $180 billion in 2020, surpassing Hollywood’s box office), and a whole new generation is becoming comfortable with representing themselves as avatars online in games and virtual environments such as Fortnite, Roblox, Minecraft, and League of Legends, which attract hundreds of millions of monthly players.
However, those chasing the metaverse, particularly Facebook metaverse, may be using the incorrect imaginary — a term for how a vision from science fiction inspires real life — and may thus miss the boat. The metaverse is manifesting and changing in front of our eyes as a result of innovations and disruptions that were unimaginable even a few years ago, and it’s unlikely that today’s mega-tech companies will be able to define its terms.

Major disruptive technologies in the past, such as Facebook, have left existing industry leaders scrambling to keep up. When the internet became popular, for example, Microsoft, a leader in desktop operating systems and applications, made a concerted effort to become the internet’s on-ramp. It fought to kill off Netscape, a popular web browser startup (which it did), but it was a pyrrhic victory at best, as new native web companies such as Google took over.
Similarly, the metaverse is evolving in front of our eyes right now, and while virtual reality and augmented reality will undoubtedly play a role, they may not be the most important.

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